Newsworthy

 

 

Profile ~ Judy Katalina, Massachusetts - 2006

Judy KatalinaJudy has been involved in women’s sports since she was a child.  As an adult, “I developed a passion for the sport of volleyball and that passion is still growing.  I have coached girls’ high school volleyball for 18 years, have been a certified volleyball official for 20 years, and have played volleyball all of my adult life.”

Judy’s league affiliations include the USA Volleyball/NERVA Regional Official and the Dual County League in which she coaches.  Her win-loss record while at Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School is unknown.

As a volunteer advocate, Judy has served for 18 years on the Board of Directors (president for 10 years) of the Yankee Volleyball Association.  One of her roles was to increase the female membership numbers and increase the playing opportunities for girls and women.  The female membership grew from 200 to 2,000, which included an increase from 0 to 900 for 18-year-old-and-under girls during her tenure.

She has also served as volleyball coordinator and tournament director for the Bay State Games and worked with the MIAA, assisting in the seeding and tournament match planning for the girls’ volleyball state tournament.

Judy has had extensive involvement in post season events.  As a coach, her Lincoln Sudbury teams have qualified for post season play 11 out of 15 years.  They have been the Dual County League Champions 5 times and State Central Section Champions for the 2005-2006 seasons.
She has been recognized for her contributions to girls and women’s sport several times.  She was presented the Unsung Hero Award from the New Agenda: Northeast in 1997, the MIAA Volleyball Team Sportsmanship Award in 2002, the Lincoln-Sudbury Staff Wellness Award in 2006, and the Division I Coach of the Year by the Boston Globe in 2005.

The following is an excerpt from a letter received by Judy from a former student, congratulating Judy when she was named by the Boston Globe as Coach of the Year.  She felt that it is the reason why she is such a strong advocate of women’s sports and why she coaches.

“You were right about something though – long after the seasons are over, you forget about the records, the stats, and the awards.  You remember the people – your teammates and, most importantly, your coach.  You were not just a coach – you were a mother, sister, nurse, counselor, teacher, mentor, role model, and friend.  It has been many years since I was playing on your team, but I have never forgotten all that you taught me and how much you supported me on the court and, even more importantly, off the court.

You have been a coach of the year for many years.  I am glad that the Boston Globe finally figured it out.  Congratulations.”